Rogues Memorabilia

This card (it’s a single card, showing both sides) is from the 1994 DC Masters series by Skybox.

The card is foil-etched, a double-sided “spectra” which is a rare chase card (in other words, difficult to find).  One side features the Flash, and the other depicts Professor Zoom.  The illustrations were painted by well-known fantasy artist Boris Vallejo.

These two cards (showing the front and back) are from the 2007 DC Legacy set by Rittenhouse.  The cards show the characters’ early Silver Age selves and also their modern look, but although the Reverse-Flash card says it’s Eobard Thawne, the modern image actually depicts Zoom.

This set also had randomly packed hand-drawn sketchcards included, and I’ve seen some Captain Colds and Professor Zooms.  But they’re not officially counted on checklists, and I don’t know how many there ever were.

These cards are from a game called Top Trumps, which is apparently popular in Europe (it seems to be rare to non-existent in North America).  There are actually a whole bunch of Top Trumps sets, based around varied themes such as characters from TV shows and movies, British celebrities, teen bands, various animals, and dinosaurs.  The cards have different stats, and the card/player with the best stats wins.
The DC version of the game was first released in 2005, and includes Captain Cold and Professor Zoom.  There was another set without Rogues in 2006, and a re-release without Rogues a few years after that.
This is literally the only image I’ve ever been able to find of these cards; I don’t have a set of my own.

These cards are from a game called Top Trumps, which is apparently popular in Europe (it seems to be rare to non-existent in North America).  There are actually a whole bunch of Top Trumps sets, based around varied themes such as characters from TV shows and movies, British celebrities, teen bands, various animals, and dinosaurs.  The cards have different stats, and the card/player with the best stats wins.

The DC version of the game was first released in 2005, and includes Captain Cold and Professor Zoom.  There was another set without Rogues in 2006, and a re-release without Rogues a few years after that.

This is literally the only image I’ve ever been able to find of these cards; I don’t have a set of my own.

In 1997, the JLA set of Overpower cards included several for James Jesse. Overpower was a collectible trading card game for players to battle each other’s teams, and each character was given stats and abilities to facilitate play.

These images show the various Trickster cards in the set.

Cards from series I of the DC Cosmic Cards set, released in 1992 by Impel.  

The ‘Great Battles’ cards depict interpretations of classic comics storylines (for instance, the three cards with Dr Alchemy are re-creating scenes from Justice League of America v1 #21-22, and the Millennium card shows Suicide Squad’s involvement in the crossover).

In 1995, Skybox released a villains trading card set under the name DC Villains: The Dark Judgment.  The art is all painted and unique to this set (meaning it isn’t used anywhere else).  Several Rogues were part of it.

I only found out about this the other day.  Heroclix player Nick Stanton won a tournament in 2011, and as his prize he got to choose a group to give an “Additional Team Ability” to.  He chose the Rogues, so they now have an official card which gives them extra capabilities in the game (and listening to players complain about them, it sounds like they needed it).
WizKids discusses some of the new ATA cards here, and you can print your own here.

I only found out about this the other day.  Heroclix player Nick Stanton won a tournament in 2011, and as his prize he got to choose a group to give an “Additional Team Ability” to.  He chose the Rogues, so they now have an official card which gives them extra capabilities in the game (and listening to players complain about them, it sounds like they needed it).

WizKids discusses some of the new ATA cards here, and you can print your own here.