Rogues Memorabilia
This 2013 book is different from the other Capstone DC books I’ve seen; the book is longer and clearly aimed at a slightly older audience (though it’s still for children).  The story is about Batman going undercover as Matches Malone to investigate a supervillain convention.  Though the Batvillains are naturally the most prominent, the Rogues are in it a fair bit.
The book is mostly text, with some illustrations.  You can see one of the art pages here.

This 2013 book is different from the other Capstone DC books I’ve seen; the book is longer and clearly aimed at a slightly older audience (though it’s still for children).  The story is about Batman going undercover as Matches Malone to investigate a supervillain convention.  Though the Batvillains are naturally the most prominent, the Rogues are in it a fair bit.

The book is mostly text, with some illustrations.  You can see one of the art pages here.

DC Super-Pets: Salamander Smackdown is a children’s book published in 2011 by Capstone.  It’s about the speedster turtle Whatzit battling two evil cyborg newts, but the newts idolize Professor Zoom and eventually become pets for his nephew.  It’s mostly text, with some illustrations by Tiny Titans creator Art Baltazar.

DC Super-Pets: Salamander Smackdown is a children’s book published in 2011 by Capstone.  It’s about the speedster turtle Whatzit battling two evil cyborg newts, but the newts idolize Professor Zoom and eventually become pets for his nephew.  It’s mostly text, with some illustrations by Tiny Titans creator Art Baltazar.

This dual-sided licenced shirt (showing the front and back) came out in 2012.  It features Alex Ross’ villains art from the Justice series.  It was formerly sold at Hot Topic, but now appears to be out of stock.

There’s another black shirt for sale these days with the same front, but it doesn’t seem to have an image on the back (and if so, Cold isn’t on it).  So be careful if you buy online.

Here’s an incredibly rare item: a kite with Mirror Master and the Flash, made by Remco in 1971.  It’s sized 34” x 34”, and made of plastic if the ad is accurate — but I’ve never seen any pictures of it aside from these.

Be prepared to pay a lot of money for this if you ever seek to buy it.

The Weather Wizard Heroclix is part of the Hypertime set, which was the first-ever DC ‘Clix set and was released in about 2002.  The figure is a bit crude, but the simulation of his flight and some weather is neat.
Weather Wizard himself is about 1.5 inches tall, but the entire figure with platform is 3 inches high.

The Weather Wizard Heroclix is part of the Hypertime set, which was the first-ever DC ‘Clix set and was released in about 2002.  The figure is a bit crude, but the simulation of his flight and some weather is neat.

Weather Wizard himself is about 1.5 inches tall, but the entire figure with platform is 3 inches high.

This convention-exclusive figure was only available at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con.  As suggested by the figures in the background, it represents Professor Zoom in the Flashpoint storyline (and not Zoom, as the text claims).  The figure is about six inches tall and comes in some surprisingly elaborate packaging.
The figure is a bit unusual because it has an entirely new head sculpt.  Many convention exclusives are typically just repaints of other toys for reasons of cost, but there was actually a bit of extra effort put into this figure.  And his expression is so deliciously evil.

This convention-exclusive figure was only available at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con.  As suggested by the figures in the background, it represents Professor Zoom in the Flashpoint storyline (and not Zoom, as the text claims).  The figure is about six inches tall and comes in some surprisingly elaborate packaging.

The figure is a bit unusual because it has an entirely new head sculpt.  Many convention exclusives are typically just repaints of other toys for reasons of cost, but there was actually a bit of extra effort put into this figure.  And his expression is so deliciously evil.

Made by Graphitti, this officially-licenced t-shirt is from about 2012.  The art is taken from the cover of Superman/Batman #63 (by Rafael Albuquerque), though with Grodd’s name in place of the torn Superman and Batman emblems.

Made by Graphitti, this officially-licenced t-shirt is from about 2012.  The art is taken from the cover of Superman/Batman #63 (by Rafael Albuquerque), though with Grodd’s name in place of the torn Superman and Batman emblems.

This card (it’s a single card, showing both sides) is from the 1994 DC Masters series by Skybox.

The card is foil-etched, a double-sided “spectra” which is a rare chase card (in other words, difficult to find).  One side features the Flash, and the other depicts Professor Zoom.  The illustrations were painted by well-known fantasy artist Boris Vallejo.

This Heat Wave (though the package spells it ‘Heatwave’) figure was released by Mattel in 2011 as part of its Justice League Unlimited line.  It was only available as a convention exclusive three-pack with Mirror Master and the Flash, though if you look around you can find people re-selling it now.

Heat Wave is a bit smaller than 4.5 inches.  It’s unfortunate that that the figure isn’t particularly easy to find, but we almost didn’t get it at all, so a convention exclusive is better than nothing.

Mattel really got a lot of mileage out of this Justice League Unlimited Mirror Master figure.  It’s been released three times — on its own (2008), as part of a three-pack with Lex Luthor and Copperhead (2006), and as part of a convention exclusive three-pack with the Flash and Heat Wave (2011).  It’s about 4.5 inches tall.

The Mirror Master sold on its own is slightly different from the ones available in the three-packs, as the solitary figure is the only version to come with a mirror.  Otherwise they all seem identical.